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Research and Articles about the Digital Divide and Homework Gap

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Research and Articles about the Digital Divide and Homework Gap

Digital Divide – Suddenly Wider

Alia Malik, a reporter for the San Antonio Express-News, explores how San Antonio families are struggling with a lack of internet access while homework assignments keep coming.
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Schools must look to the future when connecting students to the internet

O. Pinsky explores the value of having students connected to the internet in a research article published by the World Economic Forum. Pinsky explains that reliable internet access is a pillar of “any future-oriented education system.”
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Neighborhood broadband data makes it clear: We need an agenda to fight digital poverty

In a major research and advocacy campaign, Brookings documents the critical need for low-income students and families to gain stronger access to the internet, devices for accessing it and digital training. The research, led by L. Fishbane & A. Tomer, came to the surprising conclusion that “The majority of digitally disconnected households live in metropolitan areas, and the gaps are especially large when comparing neighborhoods within the same place. Effectively, some residents live in digital poverty even as their neighbors thrive.”
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Lower-income Americans make gains in tech adoption – but still rely on smartphones rather than broadband at home

In this article, Pew Research Center’s Monica Anderson points out the differences between higher and lower income communities. In households making $100,000 or more per year, access to internet, a smartphone, a laptop or desktop, and a tablet is common; but in households making under $30,000, they may own only a smartphone. This forces lower-income people to rely on their smartphones for important, non-leisure tasks like looking for jobs.
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School districts are learning that connectivity goes beyond in-school devices and wi-fi

Lack of internet access at home can cause many problems for students, even if the school has strong connectivity resources within the building. In this interview with EdTechMagazine, school district leaders talk about the strategies they have developed to combat the digital equity problem. They discuss how they are solving the problem, the trajectory of their “digital equity roadmaps,” and offer advice for other districts hoping to make similar changes.
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